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Human Development &
Capability Association

Multi-Disciplinary and People-Centred

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  1. 2020 HDCA Conference – Online (Auckland, NZ)

    A very special thank you to everyone who participated in, or otherwise supported the realisation of, our 2020 HDCA Conference. Due to COVID-19 and the corresponding global need for strict social distancing, we had to shift gear and turn the conference into an all-online event. We were thrilled that it was so appealing to such a large number of presenters and audience participants, and that it went so splendidly. It was an incredible pleasure to e-meet so many fantastic people ツ

    Hopefully, many of us will have a chance to meet non-virtually again in the near future. We hear that Antwerp is a beautiful place, among other locations.

    As always, our warmest wishes from Auckland,
    Your 2020 HDCA Conference Organisers

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    To ensure you receive news and updates, please subscribe to the email list for our 2020 event. Send a message from your email account to sympa@lists.massey.ac.nz. Make sure the subject of your email is “SUBSCRIBE 2020HDCA” (without the quotation marks), otherwise the list server will respond with an error message. Here’s a screenshot that shows what your message should look like:

    Alternatively, you can simply message the conference organisers at 2020HDCA@massey.ac.nz and they will add your address to the email list for you. The organisers are also happy to answer any conference-related questions at that address.

     

  2. 2023 HDCA Conference – Sofia, Bulgaria

    The conference will take place from 11-13 September, 2023

    Hosted by the Institute of Philosophy and Sociology – Bulgarian Academy of Sciences (IPS-BAS), Sofia University “St. Kliment Ohridski”, Open Society Institute – Sofia (OSIS), Trust for Social Achievement (TSA), and Sustainable Cooperation (SCOOP)

    ‘Vulnerability, human development and cooperative re-building in turbulent times’

    We are living in turbulent times, times characterized by dynamic, deepening inequalities both between and within societies, as well as increased levels of insecurity and vulnerability. The Covid 19 pandemic, climate change, ecological disasters, famine war in Ukraine and many other conflicts around the world, have  deepened these trends. The consequences are evident in human and non-human life posing multilayered obstacles to human development.  Between 2020 and 2021, the human development index contracted for all countries.

    Vulnerability is a feature of humanity. Martha Nussbaum notes the need for societies to acknowledge their citizens are needy and vulnerable. If vulnerability is an enduring aspect of the human condition, it needs to be addressed by individuals, collectives and institutions. The recent Covid-19 crisis demonstrated that human vulnerability is universal. But it is also shaped and experienced differently depending on economic, political and social environments.

    There are no ready, easily applied and transferable answers about how individuals and societies can cope with vulnerability amidst many emerging challenges across the world. However, there are some lessons to be learned. All crises remind us how much human lives are interrelated. In order to flourish, our societies need more cooperation at all levels – local, national and global. We need a balance between striving for individual goods and the promotion of public goods. Innovations can help, but an inclusive usage of digital technologies is necessary.

    Recent manifestations of human vulnerability raise questions about how the capability approach and the human development paradigm can help, in the contemporary context, in thinking through some of the questions of changing capability sets across social divisions of race, class, gender, age, disability and nationality. Applying the capability approach can encourage studying who benefits and who loses from recent societal developments. How is development as freedom as outlined by Amartya Sen, possible under these circumstances? Are there capabilities that can promote prosperity, hope and re-imagined futures in our contemporary world?

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  3. Online Access

    …can read issues of the Journal of Human Development & Capabilities (JHDC) online and download articles as PDFs, including the full archives of past issues. Please click below to access the online and digital articles (it only works if you are already logged in to the HDCA website with your HDCA user name). Become a member to access the journal. Become a member to access the journal A personal subscription to the Journal of Human Development & Cap…

  4. CfP: Towards 2030: Sustainable Development Goal 8: Decent Work and Economic Growth. A Sociological Perspective

    …or-market issues, Social insurance, Working poor, Precarity, Remote work Co-Editors: – Andrzej Klimczuk, SGH Warsaw School of Economics, Poland – Minela Kerla, The Association of Online Educators, Bosnia and Herzegovina – Magdalena Klimczuk-Kochańska, University of Warsaw, Poland – Piotr Toczyski, The Maria Grzegorzewska University, Poland – Delali A. Dovie, University of Ghana, Ghana SUBMISSION: Papers should be submitted through this link, using…

  5. Online Seminar: Will digital technologies save us from the pandemic?

    …Senior Fellow, Centre for International Governance Innovation (CIGI) and co-founder of Digital Public – Susan Erikson, Professor, Simon Fraser University, Canada – Stephen L. Roberts, Assistant Professor, University College London, UK – Manjari Mahajan, Associate Professor of International Affairs & Starr Professor and Co-Director of the India China Institute, The New School The discussion will be moderated by Katerini Storeng, Associate Professor…

  6. Online Discussion: People and the Planet: The Future of Development in a Post-COVID-19 World

    UNDP-UNEP in New York will hold an online high level dialogue on Zoom: 17 June, 2020, 3.30 pm CET / 9.30 am EDT. COVID19 has unleashed an unprecedented human development crisis putting at risk the hard fought gains of the last decades. It is a wake-up call on the devastating effects of the increasing pressure we are placing on our planet. But in the endeavor of confronting the multiple implications of this crisis, there is also an opportunity to…

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