Balyejjusa, Moses Senkosi (2014). 'Vision 2040: does it sufficiently promote the satisfaction of the human needs of Ugandans?' Paper presented at the annual conference of the HDCA, 2-5 September 2014, Athens, Greece.

In 2013 the president of Uganda Yoweri Kaguta Museveni launched Uganda's vision 2040. This 30 year development master plan has received both praises and criticisms from Ugandans. To the proponents, it is what Uganda lacked in order to achieve a desired level of development and progress. This is because it outlines key priority development areas the government will focus on. In addition, development interventions and actions will not be haphazard but guided. To the critics however, the vision 2040 is too ambitious and in the end will achieve little. They also fault government's dismal performance in tackling corruption as a major stumbling block to achieving the vision 2040. They argue that the resources that will be invested in the outlined development priority areas will, instead be swindled by corrupt government officials. However, in all this debate the sufficiency of the vision in promoting the human needs of Ugandans has been left out completely. Using a human needs framework, this paper analyses the sufficiency of the vision in terms of promoting the satisfaction of the human needs of Ugandans. Specifically the paper utilizes the theory of human need by Doyal Len and Gough Ian (1991) to assess whether the vision contains strategies that promote the meeting of the universal intermediate human needs (adequate nutritional food and safe water, adequate protective housing, security in childhood, physical security, non-hazardous physical environment, non-hazardous work environment, significant primary relationships, appropriate education, appropriate health care, safe birth control and child-bearing, and economic security). This is because meeting human needs is central to achieving and sustaining development and wellbeing in any society. The finding of the analysis is that the vision adequately promotes the satisfaction of 3 intermediate needs (security in childhood, safe birth control and child-bearing, and a non-hazardous physical environment), partially promotes the satisfaction of 6 intermediate needs (adequate nutritional food and safe water, protective housing, physical security, economic security, appropriate health care and appropriate education) and lacks any strategy promoting the satisfaction of 2 intermediate needs (a non-hazardous work environment and significant primary relationships). Most of the intermediate needs are partially promoted because the vision does not contain strategies aimed at tackling the challenges and bottlenecks that are currently hindering the satisfaction of these human needs. From the finding of the analysis, I conclude that the vision has inadequate strategies to promote the satisfaction of the human needs of Ugandans. Therefore, the vision does not sufficiently promote the satisfaction of the human needs of Ugandans.