A micro-spatial analysis multidimensional poverty in Gauteng province – South Africa Evidence from quality of life survey data

Mushongera, Darlington (2016). 'A micro-spatial analysis multidimensional poverty in Gauteng province – South Africa Evidence from quality of life survey data' Paper presented at the annual conference of the HDCA, Tokyo 2016.


abstract
This paper estimates a Multidimensional Poverty Index for Gauteng province of South Africa using the Alkire–Forster method. GCRO Quality of Life survey data for 2011 and 2013 is used offering an excellent opportunity for estimating poverty at smaller geographical areas. The results suggest that the Multidimensional Poverty Index for Gauteng is low but varies markedly by municipality and by ward, as well as across income groups. Not only are low income households more likely to be multidimensionally poor, they also suffer from higher intensities of poverty. Multidimensional poverty is highest in areas of low economic activity located on the edges of the province. However, pockets of multidimensional poverty do prevail even in better performing municipalities. Government, at all spheres, needs to devise policies that channel investments into lagging areas and avoid approaches that are indifferent to the heterogeneities that exist across localised geographical extents. The legacy of apartheid is that certain racial groups, particularly Blacks, were marginalized and forced to live in particular locations. The resultant geography persists to today. Analysis of poverty that takes a macro view has revealed variations across racial and income groups but cannot locate these individuals across space. This renders the analysis of no value to local municipalities where the mandate for service delivery. By generating and mapping the results of the poverty analysis we locate poverty hotspots for the province which are recommended as areas of immediate policy intervention.

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